Office of Droll Concerns

Manifesto

— for meaningful open spaces in an open society

The condition of a society is expressed in its recreational spaces, which clearly indicate the kind of relationship people have with each other and with the environment. Our behaviour is governed by rules of conduct and written and unwritten laws. Our culture expresses itself in our recreational spaces. The appearance of urban recreational spaces is determined by the planning culture, design culture and political culture. Economic values are also apparent in these spaces. Their size, layout, position and material composition indicate the degree of importance accorded to leisure and recreation, to the local environment and to people.

The manifesto picks up on points that illustrate this. It will grow over time with every BLA action, which, in each case, will make a concrete statement.

Equipment is not the solution – It takes more than a bench to make a public space

The space intended for free use by members of the public should act more to suggest than to specify an activity; it should encourage individual initiative rather than prescribe activities; it should facilitate engagement with others, not predetermine it. Surprises should happen and there should be scope for unexpected developments.

Barriers shrink the space — Yes to the removal of boundaries and permeable Access

The urban space with its compact diversity stands for encounter, conflict and negotiation, without which, instead of lively heterogeneity, only homogeneity holds sway.

Leave the space alone — No more BLA cities

Authorization is required to prioritize open areas in the city, squares, and green spaces with respect to the positioning of auxiliary buildings required for infrastructure. A negotiating mandate is needed for the different functional requirements along with expedient coordination: no more BLA cities!